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 Mexican Dogwood... 
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Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:52 pm
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Location: Hayward- S.F. Bay area Ca.
Post Mexican Dogwood...
From Mexico It's a stunner in bloom.( This has been edited)
Image

Image

Image


Last edited by Stan on Tue Apr 25, 2017 3:08 pm, edited 3 times in total.



Sat Apr 22, 2017 8:16 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 10:03 pm
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Location: Inland Cornwall UK
Post Re: Citharexylum hidalgensis.
I don't think that label matches the plant Stan.

There are other picture on the internet of that name matched with that plant but the pictures of the flowers you show are of Cornus florida subspecies urbiniana.

Citharexylum is Verbenaceae and has five petaled flowers united at their base. They are held in spikes. The wood is used for making stringed instruments [presumably including the originally Greek kithara after which the Genus is named though the Genus is all 'New World' so that must be an immigrant use].

Cornus florida subspecies urbiniana is a rather special Cornus. Has anyone grown in it in Europe?

Chad.


Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:37 am
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Location: Hayward- S.F. Bay area Ca.
Post Re: Citharexylum hidalgensis.
Now that you point it out :idea: ..a Dogwood sounds right. Thanks Chad.


Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:23 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:19 pm
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Location: Cornwall, UK
Post Re: Citharexylum hidalgensis.
Well ... now you mention it...

Image

It's an old picture - I noticed this morning how good it was looking, but it's too dark now for a photo.

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Sun Apr 23, 2017 9:22 pm
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Post Re: Citharexylum hidalgensis.
I have sold them for a few years.

Amazing to see how heavily they flower when subjected to Californian sun...

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Sun Apr 23, 2017 11:04 pm
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Location: Maryland, USA
Post Re: Florida Dogwood...
I have what is almost certainly a C. florida urbiniana X C. florida. (the former is from the cloud forests of Mexico, btw, not Florida)

So the flowers are only partway fused on 2 bracts:


Image


Tue Apr 25, 2017 1:56 am
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Location: Hayward- S.F. Bay area Ca.
Post Re: Mexican Dogwood...
That's right. What was I thinking? It was part of the Mexican cloudforest section.


Tue Apr 25, 2017 3:09 pm
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Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Post Re: Florida Dogwood...
davidmdzn7 wrote:
I have what is almost certainly a C. florida urbiniana X C. florida. (the former is from the cloud forests of Mexico, btw, not Florida)

So the flowers are only partway fused on 2 bracts:


Image


David, there are plants of C. florida from the USA (wild) that can have more or less fused bracts, so yours is probably one of them.

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Thu Apr 27, 2017 9:36 am
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Location: Maryland, USA
Post Re: Mexican Dogwood...
The seed for mine was taken off a C. florida urbiniana collected in Mexico by one of the Yucca Do guys, probably. Definitely sold as C. florida urbiniana. JC Raulston discussed adding this plant to the NCSU arboretum in the invaluable notes he left before his death. At any rate, other things about its appearance suggest it is quite unlike a typical C. florida. Believe me, I know, I see hundreds of them driving around, wild and cultivated.

If there are fused ones like that in the wild of the CONUS, it's certainly news to me - and rather surprising a selection wasn't previously made during the first heyday of C. florida cultivars from the 1920s to 1950s. Which mostly comprised the selection of unusual wild forms (narrow leaves, double flower, etc) rather than the deliberate crossings of the Orton era.


Fri May 05, 2017 3:33 am
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Post Re: Mexican Dogwood...
I remember reading about fused bracts in US populations some time ago, but can't remember where. It made me think at the time that urbiniana wasn't therefore so unusual in its fused bracts, but I'll take your word for it.

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Fri May 05, 2017 9:14 am
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