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 Disa on a rainy friday. 
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:19 pm
Posts: 409
Location: Cornwall, UK
Post Disa on a rainy friday.
It has rained all day, not that I need an excuse to play with the Disa in the greenhouse. I have had a few flower this year that I am really pleased with.
The first is this Disa uniflora form. Not one of my seedlings, but I like the bowl shaped flowers which are unusual in the species.

ImageDisa uniflora (Orange Flame x Red Velvet), 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

It has been hybridised with a number of other species, D. tripetaloides in particular.

ImageDisa tripetaloides, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

I have been making some hybrids using the yellow flowered equivalent, Disa aurata, instead.

ImageDisa aurata, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

A couple have flowered for the first time this year and I am very pleased with this Disa (Trata x Watsonii 'Candy') clone 1. It opens pale yellow and then develops veins through the tepals.

ImageDisa (Trata x Watsonii 'Candy') clone 1 2, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

I'm not quite so sure about this one. Disa (Kewensis yellow xd uniflora clone 7), it is very bright orange. Rather like the Kewensis parent but larger flowered and brighter.

ImageDisa (Kewensis yellow x uniflora clone 7), 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

First flowering here for Disa cardinalis. I have had no success raising it from seed, so I was delighted to be able to buy some seedlings three years ago. Not a common species in cultivation, it seems to impart
pure red colour to its hybrids.

ImageDisa cardinalis clone 2 2, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

Another first flowering was this clone of D. Child Safety Transvaal. I was especially pleased by the pale colour since most of the Disa I grow are orange, red or very red indeed.

ImageDisa Child Safety Transvaal 2, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

For the same reason I selected this seedling, Disa (Unifoam x Unifoam 'Majestic') clone 2. I picked it out last year for its large pale orange flower, but I didn't notice then the way the flower fades to warm white as it ages.
With two flower spikes this year it was very striking.

ImageDisa (Unifoam x Unifoam 'Majestic') clone 2, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

I have raised a number of seedlings of Disa (tripetaloides x Reheat) and they are more or less as expected, abundant smallish pink flowers. I picked this one out becdause of the white stripe on the lateral tepals.
It looks like a developmental accident, but it has done it for two years now on every flower spike, so I think it is stable.

ImageDisa (tripetaloides x Reheat) clone 1, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

This clone of Disa Riette has done a similar thing. I am told that this happens because the pink anthocyanin pigment only occurs in the top layer of cells and sometime it breaks down. Whatever the reason, it is interesting
and the plant has done it for two years now.

ImageDisa Riette clone 4, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr


Penultimately, I selected this seedling because it cheered me up. In the pouring rain today with the greenhouse dripping it did it again. It's not the best shape, the stem leans over and the flowers are a bit bunched up for the purist
but anything that cheerful is a keeper.

ImageDisa Riette clone 5, 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

But really Disa make big blobs of red in the middle of summer, so this is the best I grow. Disa Noyo 'Eva May'.

ImageDisa Noyo 'Eva May', 280717 by John Jearrard, on Flickr

Thanks for bearing with me, I hope you had decent weather today!

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Fri Jul 28, 2017 9:30 pm
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Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:42 pm
Posts: 1518
Location: Cornwall
Post Re: Disa on a rainy friday.
Weather was rubbish here to (hardly surprising given how close you are!)

Your day looks to have been more fun than mine - renewing the micro perforated film on the capillary beds in the tunnel after scraping all the old dead root off the matting, whoopee I know how to have a good time :lol: If it gets any wetter I may be forced to look at accounts!

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Sat Jul 29, 2017 7:45 am
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 3:59 pm
Posts: 7656
Location: Loughborough, Leics, central UK
Post Re: Disa on a rainy friday.
Lovely Disa's John what is the correct way of growing them we bought our first one from Tregrehan this year oh yes it was from you....lol

Jackie has it half submerged in rain water its labelled Disa riette

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Sat Jul 29, 2017 9:26 am
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Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:01 pm
Posts: 327
Location: Maryland, USA
Post Re: Disa on a rainy friday.
Nice. Longwood Gardens in PA has to grow their Disas in a summer air-conditioned conservatory, because it would otherwise be too hot for them.

Interestingly there are other orchids related to the Western Cape mountains Disas, that are native to the higher mountains of KZN (i.e, the Drakensberg). And that could be winter hardy, outdoors, in the British Isles. Alas, according to a phone call I had years ago with Rachel Saunders, they have proven very hard to cultivate. Even for the advanced gardeners of the UK. So presumably this is why we don't hear of them.


Sat Jul 29, 2017 12:45 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:19 pm
Posts: 409
Location: Cornwall, UK
Post Re: Disa on a rainy friday.
Glad to see it looking so healthy, Kev. Half submerged in rainwater is perfect. As much sun as you can short of burning the leaves.

Riette is a grex formed of the hybrid Disa (Watsonii x uniflora). It is mostly D. uniflora so the large red or orange flowers are expected.
In full, Disa (((uniflora x tripetaloides) x uniflora) x uniflora) (Disa growers first reaction to anything is to cross it back to D. uniflora!)

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Sat Jul 29, 2017 9:11 pm
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Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:06 pm
Posts: 570
Location: Telford UK
Post Re: Disa on a rainy friday.
They are very lovely John. What is the lowest temperature they will take?


Sat Jul 29, 2017 9:46 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:19 pm
Posts: 409
Location: Cornwall, UK
Post Re: Disa on a rainy friday.
Mine have been down to minus 5 C in the greenhouse without damage but it warms up in there if the sun comes out. Never seen cold damage, so not sure how low they will go. Have a tub outside since last year, sailed through winter but much slower to grow this spring, haven't got any sign of flowers yet outside.

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Sun Jul 30, 2017 9:45 pm
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 10:20 pm
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Location: Kyushu, Southern Japan (33.607N latitude)
Post Re: Disa on a rainy friday.
Beautiful collection John. Also nice to see some of the lesser known/grown species in cultivation too. Nicely done.

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Fri Aug 04, 2017 6:45 am
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