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 Life and gardens 
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Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 5:46 pm
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Location: Madrid,SPAIN
Post Life and gardens
Hello,
Some time ago I think about what happens when the gardens and collections of plants that we maintain and care for a lifetime with work, effort and considerable amounts of money, and one day we die and everything is over. Where are all those wonderful plants that grew with all our love and are often exceptional for its rarity. Those of us who love our plants know that without our care all those collections of exceptional plants and small gardens will suffer almost disappearing and dying in less than a year. It makes me sad to think about it, all that beauty that will be lost and that only interests a few, in all that botanical heritage that many of us have in our gardens and patios that will disappear as "tears in the rain" when we are not in this world. For example, does anyone know what happened to Will Giles' garden?
Although I am a person who enjoys life, do not think that I am depressed, sometimes I think about this topic, not only from my human point of view but from the point of view of the future of the species that we cultivate with passion.

What´s your opinion about this?

Regards

Mau


Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:54 pm
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Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 3:55 pm
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Location: North Thames delta UK
Post Re: Life and gardens
I think we all put a lot of our personality into our gardens (some might say that is why mine is so spiky...) and so the space becomes a very different place when we no longer have that input.

With regard to Will's garden, I understand he bequeathed it to a friend who now lives and gardens there with plans to change it, not attempt to keep it as it was. An exotic garden, but not 'The Exotic Garden'. I went to see Will a couple of weeks before he died and all that year the garden had been planted and maintained by his friends - it was almost like seeing someone else's garden. Will's personal touches were just not there - maybe it was the particular way in which he grouped the plants, the particular combinations.

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Wed Jan 24, 2018 8:26 pm
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Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 10:32 pm
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Location: Brighton Sussex uk
Post Re: Life and gardens
We've always joked about what will happen to my garden. Wife wants to concrete it all over.........with me underneath :(


Wed Jan 24, 2018 8:29 pm
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Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:46 pm
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Location: Maastricht Netherlands
Post Re: Life and gardens
garytheflounder wrote:
We've always joked about what will happen to my garden. Wife wants to concrete it all over.........with me underneath :(

Thank all the gods that I have a good wife :mrgreen:



I think about it the last year often, my health is not so good and I want to have it arranged in case off when i can not take care of it anymore!
There are a number of friends who know what they can do with my plants and animals, you have to arrange that properly.

Eduard.

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Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:13 pm
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 10:20 pm
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Location: Kyushu, Southern Japan (33.607N latitude)
Post Re: Life and gardens
Eduard, I hope you mean that you are just getting a little older and not something more serious.

I've watched many gardens fall into the fate of losing their owners. It is never pretty, so one needs to plan for that if plants are to be rescued. I've seen entire bonsai collections being basically given away because the owner just couldn't care for them anymore. I in fact am going to be getting rid of many plants this year (or so goes the plan) because I can't keep up with caring for them properly, or I fear for their fate.

Not a pleasant topic to consider, but critical for anyone who has a sizeable collection.

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Fri Jan 26, 2018 11:10 pm
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Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 7:46 pm
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Location: Maastricht Netherlands
Post Re: Life and gardens
Am already at age but still feel pretty young, that is not the point, the problem is that I get a huge high blood pressure during exertion [lifting] and they do not know how to solve this!

The doctor's advice, immediately stop my hobby! That is why I started selling the heaviest ones.

Eduard.

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Sat Jan 27, 2018 11:56 am
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Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 5:46 pm
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Location: Madrid,SPAIN
Post Re: Life and gardens
Hello,
It is true that it is a somewhat uncomfortable post :? but it is real. My union with certain of my plants has a spiritual component, getting home after work or just being in my little garden while breakfast has a healing and meditative power that is almost religious. So it seems unfair that all of this is lost some day.

In short, I have turned 50 years old and I am philosophical, nothing serious I suppose. :wink:

Eduard take care! :D


Sat Jan 27, 2018 6:36 pm
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Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:52 pm
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Location: Hayward- S.F. Bay area Ca.
Post Re: Life and gardens
One day I have to talk to the son in law about my plants- tell him the value and what to ask for on ebay. Even where to announce " Mama,Stan wont be needing these trowels any more,I cant use them anymore" ( Dylan)
I actually keep to myself now,because when I have slipped and said $$$ for this plant,my wife says "Then sell it". I no longer do that.


Sun Jan 28, 2018 12:20 am
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Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2007 4:06 am
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Location: Waimarama NZ
Post Re: Life and gardens
I'm beating the future by outplanting it. It's easy enough to remove a shrub or cut down a tree, but I've planted close to 300,000 trees which is kind of like a great challenge crossed with a one finger salute to anyone in the future who might want to return it to bare ground!

A more serious reply, our garden spaces suit or personalities, future personalities that inhabit what is now our space will express themselves in their own way. This is a good thing... and we can't change it even if we wanted to.

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Sun Jan 28, 2018 4:55 am
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Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:02 pm
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Location: Mid-West, Ireland.
Post Re: Life and gardens
There's nothing really I can do about it when I'm changed into alternative carbon.

I realize my garden is a massive amount of work and to expect someone else to keep that up wouldn't be fair so I'm just not going to think about it unfortunately.


Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:42 am
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 3:59 pm
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Location: Loughborough, Leics, central UK
Post Re: Life and gardens
I have the feeling when we are no more our children will build another house over our garden then get to sell 2 instead of one. :shock:


Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:44 pm
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Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:32 pm
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Location: Folkestone Kent UK
Post Re: Life and gardens
All so melancholy !................The most important seeds any of us gardeners sow are in the minds of people who see and like our gardens. I'd wager there are mini me gardens all over the place, people trying to emulate. Think of it that way and you're immortal.


Adrian (feeling particularly Zen)


Tue Jan 30, 2018 7:48 am
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Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:01 pm
Posts: 334
Location: Maryland, USA
Post Re: Life and gardens
Eduard O wrote:
garytheflounder wrote:
We've always joked about what will happen to my garden. Wife wants to concrete it all over.........with me underneath :(

Thank all the gods that I have a good wife :mrgreen:

...



Eduard.


Thank God for the English, to always have a proper sarcastic and/or satirical POV on almost any subject. The spirit of Jonathan Swift yet lives!

This topic is clearly one of the worst aspects of gardening. Other peoples' "life's work" can be kept in a more portable and less fugitive manner. You can think you've planned for it, even have your offspring on-board, if you are so 'blessed' as to have them...and those plans can still go awry. (and if you don't plan for it, they will go awry....as happened at Rarefind) In the first few years of my own garden, I used to entertain charmingly naive visions of someday donating it to a local municipality as a public garden. In the manner of what happened at McCrillis gardens down near DC. Well, I've only been there 3 times in the past 15 years, but every time I go there the rhododendrons look sicker and sicker. And I'm pretty sure there are fewer and fewer of them. Even the best horticulturalists the vaunted Montgomery County* can scrounge up, cannot keep the garden entirely as the founders would have wanted. (not to disparage it as poorly maintained though...it's not) So, 40 years down the road, a couple more generations of American de-evolution, there's not a snowball's chance in hell the local mouth-breathing hayseeds would have any ability to maintain my collector's garden, much less even have an interest in doing so!
So, like a lot of things...the solution for most of us is not to worry about it!

* - an allusion likely to befuddle most readers here (and many in the US)...but within 'local planning' circles, this is known as one of the best managed counties in the USA. For people with visions of European-style governmental agency, i.e., vast authority to plan with and manage resources like land. And within a state already known as a leader in land and municipal planning...for example, one of the first to develop vaguely European-seeming approaches to historic preservation. So it's doubtful McCrillis Gardens would have been preserved, such as they were and when they were, in an "average" municipality in an "average" American state.


Fri Feb 16, 2018 12:56 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 10:03 pm
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Location: Inland Cornwall UK
Post Re: Life and gardens
davidmdzn7 wrote:

Thank God for the English, to always have a proper sarcastic and/or satirical POV on almost any subject. The spirit of Jonathan Swift yet lives!


I'm not sure that even though his parents were born English and he wrote in English the Irish Swift would wish to be called English! Despite splitting his life between Ireland and England, he was ordained into The Church of Ireland and rose to be Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin where he is buried.

Back to the subject.

I think there is a distinction between gardens as process or artefact.

Hard landscaping may survive us, but the plants will not last unchanged. Trees that grow after we have gone will be managed differently from how we may have done. When disease wipes out one of our plantings [I am thinking of the polyanthus at Sissinghurst] what comes next will not be part of 'our' garden plan.

As The National Trust has demonstrated here in the UK trying to 'fix' a garden as it was once its author has gone is a disaster: trying to 'capture the spirit' by committee was worse. They are trying now to give head gardeners more 'individual' control, but most of the great gardens were created by an owner and head gardener; often with creative friction between them!

It is a different gardening process to take over an established garden. I think most of us on this board have been proud to 'create' our gardens. We shouldn't wish the next generation to maintain them but rather celebrate that what we have created is written on the wind. The plantsfolk amongst us may have left them some new material to play with. A few will have left 'structure' but within a few years if a garden is cared for by some one new it has become a 'new' garden. That is as it should be. Both plants and gardens grow. Our hand may have shaped its development, but where it goes next is beyond our control. To hope for it to be 'fixed' is to wish it dead.

Chad


Sat Feb 17, 2018 5:16 pm
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Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:01 pm
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Location: Maryland, USA
Post Re: Life and gardens
LOL, I knew someone would catch that. Thought of substituting Pope, but it seemed more like Swiftian humor!

"Jonathan Swift was born on 30 November 1667 in Dublin, Ireland. He was the second child and only son of Jonathan Swift (1640–1667) and his wife Abigail Erick (or Herrick) of Frisby on the Wreake.[4] His father was a native of Goodrich, Herefordshire, but he accompanied his brothers to Ireland to seek their fortunes in law after their Royalist father's estate was brought to ruin during the English Civil War. "

I doubt that the locals working for his father thought of him as Irish! Willing himself to become Irish, might have, in fact, been the most genius satire of all and offers proof of the complex fungibility of identity and ethnicity in pre-republic Ireland...but I digress.


Sat Feb 17, 2018 7:32 pm
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