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 Halleria lucida and other cauliflorous plants 
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Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:51 pm
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Location: Camberwell, London, UK
Post Halleria lucida and other cauliflorous plants
This morning I noticed that the Halleria lucida (also known as tree fuchsia, but actually unrelated to fuchsias) which I've grown from seed five year ago is flowering for the first time. Yay! :lol:

It's native to South Africa but obviously doesn't mind a bit of cold.

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To be honest, I was actually hoping the flowers would be a bit darker orange, but I'm mainly growing it because it is supposedly cauliflorous (flowers directly from the stems/trunk) - something that's very unusual in temperate plants but quite common in tropical plants, so can give quite a tropical feel to a temperate garden (or so I'm hoping) and can look quite spectacular when the flowers are sprouting from old, otherwise bare wood. The only other cauliflorous plants I can think of that can be grown in temperate climates are Cercis spp. (which I also grow and are spectacular in the spring).

Does anyone know of any others?

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Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:14 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 10:03 pm
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Location: Inland Cornwall UK
Post Re: Halleria lucida and other cauliflorous plants
JonathanG wrote:
Does anyone know of any others?


Firstly respect to you for flowering the Halleria, I got it to germinate but now only have a labelled pot with no plant in it!

Temperate cauliflory is tantalisingly at the edge of 'growing on the edge' for the UK. Cercis is the only genus I know that is reliable. There are a lot of 'just out reach' ones though.

Firstly a reliably hardy cheat. Lathraea clandestina often has flowers on visible roots or just a little way up the trunk of its parasitised host.

A lot of Ficus are cauliflorous but not hardy. I'm still trying to source Ficus auriculata which should be winter hardy, but may need hotter summers than even my tunnel can provide for it to recover in the summer.

Several of the Myrtle relatives boast hardiness below 0C, but I've never seen them in the flesh. Myrciaria cauliflora is quoted as hardy to 25F or -3.8C. Syzygium are predominantly cauliflorous, and S.cumini is supposed to be hardy to -12C. The more exciting red flowered species such as S.wilsonii are less hardy.

The genus Mucuna are mainly cauliflorous, and Mucuna nigricans may be winter hardy. Is this the one that flowers on Tresco?

Vasconcellea pubescens is cauliflorous, but you have to look carefully to convince yourself of that. Hardy to about -2C under cover here.

Finally one that is almost hardy if it gets hot summers to ripen the wood. Ceratonia siliqua The Carob tree.

BUT, I'm happy with Cercis which is a very fine example and holds its own against all of the tropical examples and is reliably hardy and trouble free.

Chad.


Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:21 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 9:17 pm
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Location: vancouver, canada
Post Re: Halleria lucida and other cauliflorous plants
A lot of Agapetes species are (Ericaceae family) but I guess they are not considered hardy. Very close to hardy----I just bring them in a cool garage when cold trouble.
Chad, I know you personally had trouble with Agapetes, but do others grow Agapetes unprotected in Cornwall?

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Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:45 pm
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Location: Inland Cornwall UK
Post Re: Halleria lucida and other cauliflorous plants
I believe George Hugh Boscawen, 9th Viscount Falmouth has it outside at Tregothnan.

I know of several others who had grown it [serepens] or its locally created hybrid 'Ludgvan Cross' for a few decades but all were lost in 2010.

John, who posts on here certainly has several, but are they under cover John?

Does anyone remember it at Tremenheere?

Chad.


Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:21 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:19 pm
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Location: Cornwall, UK
Post Re: Halleria lucida and other cauliflorous plants
Under cover here. I'm sure 'Ludgvan Cross' would be hardy here most of the time in the right place. A. serpens died under cover in 2010 but has been ok since. I get more problems with old plants than young ones, but there may be several reasons for that.

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Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:37 pm
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