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 Spring Growth 
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Is that a Fatsia polycarpa behind the Trochodendron Kev? It has a silvery look about it.


Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:47 am
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Hi Lee,
That is Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web' its first year in the ground. It went all limp when it got frosted then snowed on but has come through more or less untouched and though very slow growing it seems to be bulkiing up quite nicely now.


Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:57 am
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Nice wheel tree Kev. I can't say that I remember seeing one of these in the wild here, though I've probably walked past hundreds. They have the typical look of many local trees.

Your Veratrum is still looking quite sharp - when do these usually go dormant for you? I'll have to get a Podophyllum this year - such dramatic foliage on them. I also spy a Heloniopsis in there. What species is it? Do you grow any Epimediums?

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Sat Apr 18, 2009 10:26 pm
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It was either last November or November 2007 when I visited my cousin who works at the NY Botanical Garden and was very disappointed to see that the large Trochodendron aralioides tree just by the entrance to the NYBG main office has been sacrificed to some building improvements works. At 3m+ tall and considerably broader, it must have been a very old tree (this is one s-l-o-w plant), as well as a beauty. If I had a bigger garden, I'd certainly find room for one.

My cousin didn't know exactly why it had been felled, but it's gone. If there was a 3m tall tree in New York, at least we know that this plant is rock-solid hardy in England.

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Sun Apr 19, 2009 12:36 am
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I would think David that the botanical garden most likely moved that valuable plant. It just hard to believe that such a manageable sized small tree couldn't be moved by bobcat and a garden full of horticulturists with young backs.
Jeez,you think we Americans are THAT big of boobs :wink:


Sun Apr 19, 2009 3:25 am
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Stan wrote:
I would think David that the botanical garden most likely moved that valuable plant.


I would have thought so, but my cousin wasn't aware of it being anywhere else on the site and she knows the place inside-out, having worked there for two long stints over the years.

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Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:01 am
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Quote:
I also spy a Heloniopsis in there. What species is it


Tom I have a couple Heloniopsis orientalis "Korean form" , Heloniopsis orientalis var breviscapa also Helonias bullata and in shot there is Podophyllum pleianthum which does not show up so well against the bark chippings unlike Podophyllum "Spotty Dotty" we also like Ypsilandra thibetica over here is that one you can get in Japan it hails from China I believe..oh yes there is a Syneilesis palmata there to that always grew one leaf at a time, last year it flowered, this year I have 8 leaves.. 8)
Quote:
Do you grow any Epimediums


I think you might well just have been with Jackie Ewen and myself yesterday because when you wrote this thread I did not have any but on seeing some beauties at Nick Macer's PGP I now have 3....great minds think alike........how about you?

Here is a leaf from one

Image

You may be able to make out a few more here.

Image


Sun Apr 19, 2009 5:16 pm
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Post I Love Woodland Plants Too!
Nice to see so many woodland plants there Kev! I don't have any Epimediums yet simply because I didn't have space before - now I have tons, so this fall I'll pick up an assortment. I'm lucky because I can order directly from a nursery in Shikoku that specializes in woodland perennials, so I can get almost anything I desire easily. Locally Heloniopsis orientalis can be found in abundance, so sourcing them is no problem!

Let's see, about your haul - I see several Epimediums, a Trillium of the sessile group, what looks to be a Podophyllum, another Heloniopsis and I'm not sure about that Liquidambar looking plant - looks spiny! Here's a lovely little woodland perennial, Psuedotrillium rivale 'Gunnar':

Image

Talk about a miniature!

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Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:42 am
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Kev Spence wrote:
Hi Lee,
That is Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web' its first year in the ground. It went all limp when it got frosted then snowed on but has come through more or less untouched and though very slow growing it seems to be bulkiing up quite nicely now.


Hi Kev

Is that a new variety as Ive not heard of it, but then again we are 20 years behind over here!! :lol: Still no Waggies, Brahea armata of Musa sikkimensis! Somebody would make a killing if they could get past the enormous red tape with importing plants.

Anyway nice plant there mate. I hope to see it full size with the "webs"!! lol

Lee


Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:46 am
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Tom love that Psuedotrillium rivale you just need a river of those trailing through your wooded area...sounds expensive.

Its good to hear you can pick up some good woodland plants as sometimes you feel embarrased by the wealth of plants available in the UK.

The liquidamber type plant is indeed spiny and is Kalopanax septemlobus from the Araliaceae family.

Lee ,

The Fatsia has been around for a number of years now and is from Cotswold garden flowers but is very slow growing but has a wonderful spiders web marbling to it.

Spiders web


Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:09 pm
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I think Trillium spp. are lovely, but I've always been under the impression that they're martyrs to molluscs. If someone knows otherwise, or can recommend some species that can shrug off such attentions, tell me what they are, as I have ample room for all manner of shade-loving woodland understorey planting.

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Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:51 pm
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David,
Slugs don't seem to bother the two Trilliums I have: T grandiflorum and T cuneatum.
The leaves look untouched this year ... but no flowers this time :?


Mon Apr 20, 2009 9:23 pm
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Now you come to mention it Pete I do not think mine are bothered either I will check them out tomorrow and snap a pic.
They are probably queuing up next to my Cardiocrinum and Veratrum ....... :lol:


Mon Apr 20, 2009 9:34 pm
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Post 
Psuedotrillium?

The splitters and lumpers are clearly going to war again.

I though Paris and Trillium were being combined. To split of rivale into a separate genus of its own is going the other way.

Still, I guess they agree that the original Paris Trillium division is untenable.

Ho hum

Chad.


Mon Apr 20, 2009 9:36 pm
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