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 Polygonatum vietnamicum 
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Location: Inland Cornwall UK
Post Polygonatum vietnamicum
I was given an 8ft single flowering stem of his as a swap from Tom Hudson at Tregrehan last year in a rather small pot. It was potted into a 15L pot and sunk into the soil in the poly-tunnel. It pushed through the soil rather early this year [a relief that it appeared at all and a bit of a worry it was so early] and is now flowering on 5 shoots. So far they are three foot tall, but there is plenty more growth to come.

It has very little written about it [Graham Stewart Thomas simply notes that 'The red flowered P.kingianum is .... very tender'. We think he meant this species which hadn't been formally described when he was writing]. Tom has a form with even longer flowers in his shade house but both of his forms have larger flowers than the form shown by Crug at Chelsea.

Is this grown in USA? You are so much closer to Vietnam both geographically and [hmmm] historically I would guess you have earlier and more diverse introductions?

Chad.

Oh, I nearly forgot the pictures!

Polygonatum vietnamicum
Image


Image

And just to show there is so much more yet to come..



Image
Polygonatum vietnamicum still growing.


Wed Apr 02, 2014 3:28 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Chad you have a veritable cornucopia of plants in your tunnel do they do what they want/
Have you tried pulling pieces up yet to try to multiply your plant or is it still early days?
The picture of Crugs plant does look quite fine and longer flowers would be even better.


Wed Apr 02, 2014 10:01 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
It could be that I have seen some similair Polygonatum in the Himalayas. Well something related anyway.

Alexander

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Sat Apr 05, 2014 1:22 am
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Kev,

I was [to be honest] only hoping for one shoot this year. That it has filled the 15L pot at one go was a surprise. Last years shoot stayed winter green [but it was a very mild winter]. The new shoots are all round the edge of the pot, so it will need something doing for next year. I think letting it dry out for the winter and lifting and dividing it in January is probably the plan now.

Alexander,

The e-flora of China doesn't recognise the taxon yet. The description for Polygonatum kingianum doesn't seem to include it. If you do a Google for kingianum though you will find pictures of the red one. Some of them have the 'dumpy' flowers of the Crug form, and some the larger, elongated flowers of the Tom Hudson form. The red form certainly extends into Burma [further if you have seen it further west], and I think is probably at least two [as yet not formally separated] species.

Chad.


Sat Apr 05, 2014 7:00 am
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Chad, that is a very impressive rate of growth. I saw this growing at Tregrehan a couple of years ago and was really taken with it, but was not aware it is now going under the name of P. vietnamicum.

I planted out the yellow-flowered P. kingianum last spring - a Crug acquisition that carried the warning "may not be hardy". It has come through the recent winter, such as it was, (tallest shoot currently about 18" and going strong) but I wonder if anyone on here has any experience of its hardiness? Incidentally, I enquired of Bleddyn W-J at the time whether they would be offering the red "kingianum" but he told me they had not had any success in getting their plants to set seed. We live in hope!

Chris

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Last edited by Chris Callard on Mon Apr 07, 2014 9:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Mon Apr 07, 2014 8:20 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Chris,

Tom's forms are so much better than Crug's that I think we need it to be his that get into commerce.

Seed may be available later [I don't know the provenance of the origin for these] here under the name kingianum.

I didn't get seed last year; the flowers are so nectar rich they dripped it out and obscured the sexual parts of the flowers.

I believe Mark Fillan may have set seed from this clone though.

I have a small plant of kingianum 'pink form' but it has only done one winter and that in the tunnel so I don't know its hardiness yet either.

Chad.


Mon Apr 07, 2014 9:13 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Thanks, Chad, I will keep checking the potential sources you suggest.

Comparing the photos I can see why you favour the Tom Hudson form over the Crug form - let's hope it isn't too long before it makes its commercial debut!

Chris

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Mon Apr 07, 2014 9:48 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
As with most semi(?) invasive from the roots Polygonatums, wouldn't divisions be the easiest way to propagate it? Many are declared invasive weeds in parts of the USA, but I haven't seen this one around here in northern California. It doesn't do anything for me, but I do have one monster shrubby Polygonatum that gets 10 feet tall and is winter deciduous, with a cloud of cream fading to reddish pink infloescences in late summer. Fortunately not invasive by seed here, but I do keep the roots confined. I forget the species, it came via Digging Dog Nursery up the coast.

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Mon Apr 07, 2014 10:37 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
david feix wrote:
Wouldn't divisions be the easiest way to propagate it?


Well yes; but we are impatient to have enough to share around more widely!

Chad.


Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:33 am
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Chad wrote:
Kev,

I was [to be honest] only hoping for one shoot this year. That it has filled the 15L pot at one go was a surprise. Last years shoot stayed winter green [but it was a very mild winter]. The new shoots are all round the edge of the pot, so it will need something doing for next year. I think letting it dry out for the winter and lifting and dividing it in January is probably the plan now.

Alexander,

The e-flora of China doesn't recognise the taxon yet. The description for Polygonatum kingianum doesn't seem to include it. If you do a Google for kingianum though you will find pictures of the red one. Some of them have the 'dumpy' flowers of the Crug form, and some the larger, elongated flowers of the Tom Hudson form. The red form certainly extends into Burma [further if you have seen it further west], and I think is probably at least two [as yet not formally separated] species.

Chad.

Chad,

I remember that plant from somewhere. But canot find a picture of it. Well I have seen them at least in North Carolina in Raleigh in a botanical garden. Well those Himalaya mountains are for lots of eastern Asiatic plants the most westerly place of their distribution.

Alexander

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Wed Apr 09, 2014 1:53 am
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Well, three years on ... an update.

Following Chad's suggestion, I got in touch with Green Mile Nursery in Belgium and in October 2014 they were able to send a small division of their red flowered Polygonatum kingianum.
No flowers produced in 2015 or '16, so was very pleased to see some this Spring ...

ImagePolygonatum kingianum - red form by Chris, on Flickr

ImagePolygonatum kingianum - red form by Chris, on Flickr

ImagePolygonatum kingianum - red form by Chris, on Flickr

Still somewhat confused as to whether I should be calling it kingianum red, or vietnamicum? :?

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Sun Jul 02, 2017 8:41 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Chris,

That looks a good form of 'the red one'.

It falls outside the circumscription of P.kingianum and was described as a separate species in 1986, but horticultural use is lagging behind. [L.I.Abramova : Novosti Sist. Vyssh. Rast. 23: 47 (1986) 1986]

The whole of the genus is being revised slowly. I suspect the 'red kingianum' is more than one species; look at the variation in flower length and the open or closed mouth. I can't get mine to set seed; the flowers are so full of nectar I can't see the sexual organs.

The next one to track down is the white equivalent.

Incidentally, can anyone see on that site what country it is in?

I have seedlings from a 'red kingianum', they should flower next year.

Chad.


Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:02 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Nice work Chris it looks a very elegant plant you have there a nice contrast between the red and green.


Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:46 pm
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Post Re: Polygonatum vietnamicum
Thanks for the information, Chad. I shall continue to refer to it as the red kingianum for now, pending publication of the revision!

I have another (even) smaller plant coming along slowly from Alpine Garden http://www.alpine-garden.com/goods.php?id=98. No flowers as yet.

The white form from Chlorophyllia is very nice, too, if perhaps less instantly striking. They seem to be based in British Columbia.

Thanks, Kev. Yes, I was pleased with it when it finally flowered. I saw your photos of the wonderful plant at Tregrehan on your recent thread - that's the one that first got me searching for it, after seeing it there a few years ago. (Several pics on your thread I had intended to go back to before photobucket stopped our fun :( ... unbelievable).

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Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:46 pm
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