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 Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii 
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 10:03 pm
Posts: 1344
Location: Inland Cornwall UK
Post Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
Two questions.

1.Has anyone in the UK still got one of these Manihot still growing? They were getting quite popular before the colder winters.

2. Are Manihot carthaginensis and grahamii as grown the same thing? They should be separate species, but I'm not sure I've been convinced that what is circulating isn't all the same. Seed of Manihot carthaginensis is available again , but shouldn't be hardy; I'm hoping it is mislabelled grahamii!

Chad.


Fri Apr 25, 2014 9:12 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 9:44 am
Posts: 1407
Location: Penzance, Cornwall, UK
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
Well, I've definitely got M. grahamii and it's done well outside all winter and is putting out new leaves. Mind you it's only a baby yet, about 3ft high.

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Sat Apr 26, 2014 10:07 am
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Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 2:25 pm
Posts: 1102
Location: Suffolk, UK
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
Mine is flowering at the moment.

Image

Pete

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Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:42 pm
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Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2010 7:06 am
Posts: 195
Location: Newport Wales
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
I was lucky to get some Grahamii seed and cuttings from a private garden 8/9 months ago. A few months on i have several plants planted out and two in pots for " insurance".
The best is this 4ft seed grown , now flowering ............

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Potted insurance plants..........



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Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:43 am
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Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 2:25 pm
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Location: Suffolk, UK
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
I've never tried with cuttings, Taffy.
What method did you use and what success rate did you get, please?

Pete

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Sun Sep 03, 2017 5:44 pm
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Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2010 7:06 am
Posts: 195
Location: Newport Wales
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
Hi Pete,
cuttings were about 8" long, into a large pop bottles so i could see if they were rooting without any disturbance , 50/50 compost and perlite, approx 20c and i had 100% rooting .

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Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:46 am
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Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 2:25 pm
Posts: 1102
Location: Suffolk, UK
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
Thanks, Taffy.
I might give that a try.

Pete

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Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:13 pm
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Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 187
Location: arthog, gwynedd, wales
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
Having read this post I quite fancy one of these, although I suspect the cold summers here are not Ideal. The only supplier I can find is Treseders which is a bit of a round trip for me! Does any one know of an alternative source. The other option is seed from USA. Do they grow easily from seed.

Thanks Jas. :wink:

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Tue Sep 05, 2017 8:28 am
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 10:03 pm
Posts: 1344
Location: Inland Cornwall UK
Post Re: Manihot carthaginensis and/or grahamii
junglejason wrote:
Do they grow easily from seed?


Yes. Easy to germinate. Very temperamental as seedlings and then easy again once they are established.

When Sunshine seeds have stock it is M.grahamii despite using the 'other name'.

Having waded through The Monograph I am now confident all the plants I have seen in the UK under either name are M.grahamii.

I'm using 'the American method' of cuttings. Any top growth that hasn't died back over winter can be used as hardwood cuttings in the Spring. I understand in colder parts of the USA they cut the plant to the ground in the autumn not expecting the stock to survive. The woody growth is overwintered as a bunch of sticks and kept frost free and planted as cuttings in the spring. With their much hotter summers they get descent 'annual' plants. I'm hoping the rootstock will continue to regrow next year as well [it did this year].

This seems to be a plant that likes the East of the UK and their hotter summers more than Cornwall. Here it was a bit pathetic outside; it is much happier in the polytunnel.

Chad.


Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:41 am
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