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 Calanthe Photos 
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 10:20 pm
Posts: 3606
Location: Kyushu, Southern Japan (33.607N latitude)
Post Calanthe Photos
David's inquiry about growing these plants inspired me to dig up some old photos. Yes, they can be troublesome to grow, but they are pretty amazing.

This is a very nice hybrid stud plant at Shikoku Gardens Nursery. Like other complex hybrids, Calanthe are hard to ID from the flowers. I neglected to write down the parentage of this one, so it is difficult to say exactly what the parents were. Likely it is a x takane (discolor x sieboldii) or x satsuma (discolor x sieboldii x aristulifera) based hybrid.

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The most northern ranging species in Japan, C. tricarinata, is beautiful in itself. Here is a plant on the island of Shikoku.

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Another range of flowers are the x kozu (izu-insularis x discolor) types. These are quite consistent in color usually, with a white lip and dark blue-purple sepals and petals. They can be quite fragrant. Generally speaking the flowers are smaller and more numerous than other hybrids. This plant was at a local show.

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Another hybrid from the same show, very possibly a x satsuma type.

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A large growing and flowering form of C. sieboldii exists on Taiwan. This plant is known as kawakami ebine (C. kawakamiense) in Japan. Currently there is a lot of discussion about the naming of C. sieboldii and its hybrids that remains unresolved. Kew considers all of them synonymous with C. striata, but that probably will be changing in the next couple years. Anyway, this is a huge plant, growing nearly a meter high when happy. Mine is not so happy, but here it is.

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Finally, a patch of Calanthe in my garden. The yellow flowered plants are C. sieboldii and the purple flowered plant is an unnamed C. discolor hybrid.

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Are they worth growing? Sure, if you don't mind a challenge and disappointment! Terrestrial orchids in general are not for the weak spirited, and these plants definitely are not "easy" - at least not in the long term.

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Sat Feb 07, 2009 10:38 pm
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Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 3:54 am
Posts: 2226
Location: Berkeley, California
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Tom,
Thanks so much for the additional photos, and it looks like these do very well for you in your garden, again, just absolutely gorgeous plants! I may just have to try growing some myself!


Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:39 am
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:55 pm
Posts: 3344
Location: Leidschendam, The Netherlands. (52 N latitude)
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I had Calanthe discolor and C. sieboldii in the past, no easy plants and after a couple of years they died. Well our native orchids have some easy species like Dactylhorzia majalis and D. praetermissa.

Beautifull plants and pictures by the way, but you get the right climate there, thats the whole differnece.

Alexander

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Sun Feb 08, 2009 5:10 pm
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Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2008 4:02 pm
Posts: 2309
Location: Germany USDA 8b
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Tom,

fabulous shots of evenly fabulous plants. Since all of the parent species are hardy in my 8b climate, I'll surely give more of them a try, when I can get them from a virus free source.

Alexander,

fantastic are also Epipactis hybrids like 'Sabine' or E. palustris. Most of the Dactylorhitza seem to need Mykorrhiza int the ground, which makes growing quite fussy.

On this behalf Epipactis are far easier, as E. helleborine can be considered as a weed in both of our countries. I have it everywhere in my garden. I wish it would be showier!
Epipactis helleborine:
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I visit a meadow in the Eifel hills every year, where around 30 of our native orchid species grow. This May I'll certainly show some pics.

One shot I have available right now is Gymnadenia conopsea:
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Regards,


Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:40 pm
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:55 pm
Posts: 3344
Location: Leidschendam, The Netherlands. (52 N latitude)
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Steven,

I had Epipactis palustris in the garden in the past. It did very well there for some time. Several orchids grow here in Leidschendam, including the E. palustris. And Dactylorhiz praetermisa grows by the thousends here.

Alexander

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Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:59 am
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Joined: Mon Sep 08, 2014 9:30 am
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Location: usa
Post Re: Calanthe Photos
wow, what a nice flower pics, i find there a great info about lilies................

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Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:16 am
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