The team | View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Sep 23, 2017 4:36 pm



Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
 Camera test 
Author Message

Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2010 1:33 am
Posts: 108
Location: NW Ontario Canada
Post Camera test
I have heard some conflictive veiws on the quality of my digital camera. I got a very good deal on it. I was wondering if you can tell the quality, just based on a photograph? If so, here is one. Im a novice phrotographer, but have seen some pretty nice places.

Ill tell you what kind of camera it is, but i would like some non biased opinions, based on the photo please. So feel free to critique it in any way. Id like some input on camera/picture quality, over all composition ETC, just so I have a better understanding of what Im doing while taking photographs..

Thanks once again
Jesse


Image

_________________
Jesse


Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:58 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2009 10:20 am
Posts: 98
Location: Eastbourne UK
Post Re: Camera test
Taking pictures into the sun can be very effective, and can produce much more interesting shots than the traditional 'sun behind the camera' shot, (having the sun anywhere other than behind the camera will usually produce a more interesting photograph), but it can be very difficult if you are going to include the sun in the frame, I would suggest you try to keep the sun out if the picture.

Composition wise your photograph is quite interesting, having the slopes of the mountains converging towards the heads of the people leads the eye to the crucial point. The horizontal divisions are good too, giving a good balance between the area of flat snow, mountain and sky. But I would suggest you look very carefully at little details, it might have been even more interesting if you had included the feet of the people, and some of the foot prints in the snow leading up to them; doing so might give a much greater impression of the vastness of the landscape.

Technically the picture does not look very sharp. With a shot such as this you probably want both the people in the foreground and the mountains in the background in focus. To achieve this you will need to use a small aperture, something from f16 to f22; that will give you a good depth of field or depth of focus. (You will need too use the camera on manual or with aperture priority to achieve this).

At the moment no part of the picture appears to be in sharp focus, it is difficult to say why this is so with just one photograph to go on. If you used auto-focusing that could be the problem, auto-focusing is not always reliable, I prefer to focus manually if it is practical.

I would recommend that you experiment with your camera. Take the same subject using different settings (different shutter speed and aperture combinations). Also experiment with the focusing, focus on different parts of the subject to see how much is in focus in front of and behind the point of focus. Take notes of the setting you use for each shot because you will never remember when you come to compare them!

A few words on aperture and depth of field. The smaller the aperture the greater the depth of filed, that means that much of the picture, foreground and background will probably be in focus. However they may be occasion when you do not want everything in sharp focus, maybe you want to isolate a flower against a blurred background. To achieve this use a large aperture (eg f4).


Mon Mar 15, 2010 3:55 pm
Profile

Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2010 1:33 am
Posts: 108
Location: NW Ontario Canada
Post Re: Camera test
Well, i was mid step takin that pic, and yes it was on auto ( as far as I remember). When i first seen the pic, I was like " ah crap if I included their feet...", LOL It happens.

Thanks for the advice.... Ill have to test it out on the yard this year..

_________________
Jesse


Mon Mar 15, 2010 7:44 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 10:24 pm
Posts: 214
Location: Bristol, UK
Post Re: Camera test
One classic test was to take a photo of a sheet of newspaper, from the other side of the room. When you get it onto the computer, have a look at full resolution (1 camera pixel per screen pixel) and see how sharp the print looks. If none of it looks sharp, even the headlines, then it points to a lens quality problem.

_________________
Francis Bell, growing Proteas in Bristol.
51:29N 02:35W 63m ASL


Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:01 pm
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 4 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.