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 Mahonia confusa ‘Nari hira’ 
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Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:40 pm
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Post Mahonia confusa ‘Nari hira’
I'd like to get my hands on one of these, but i have no idea where to start. It looks like they are fairly new to cultivation and maybe just available in the US?

They look quite different from the standard mahonia you see around, very fine in appearance and almost a chamaedorea radicalis look about it.

Does anyone know if there are any UK suppliers?


Mon Dec 07, 2009 9:37 pm
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Hi Vic,

Crug has Mahonia confusa not sure if thats the one you are after as does Cotswold garden flowers.


Mon Dec 07, 2009 10:47 pm
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Thanks for that Kev, not quite the same as what i have seen , obviously the 'Narihira' variation that gives the finer appearance.

http://www.pref.saitama.lg.jp/A06/BQ30/ ... me1086.htm


Mon Dec 07, 2009 11:01 pm
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The correct name for Mahonia confusa is now M. eurybracteata and there are forms of it in the wild with much narrower foliage than we have become used to. I was given a tiny plant of M. eurybracteata subsp. ganpinensis with very narrow foliage, but it didn't make it.

I stock good amounts of standard M. eurybracteata (still labelled as M. confusa) and the variation in foliage colour is notable - anything from yellow-green to pewter.

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Mon Dec 07, 2009 11:22 pm
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Thanks Nick, I must pay you a visit next time i'm working over your way.


Tue Dec 08, 2009 7:26 am
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Vic wrote:
Thanks for that Kev, not quite the same as what i have seen , obviously the 'Narihira' variation that gives the finer appearance.


In many cases, labeling of plants does not always conform to a preconceived type. Here is the 'Narihira' clone being distributed in the U.S.

http://www.tarheelnativetrees.com/DSCN9647.JPG

Compared to the picture Vic linked to, its leaflets are considerably wider and its overall appearance less gracile.

I think that for now, getting a form of Mahonia eurybractea/confusa that conforms to your expectations will remain a matter of seeking out an individual specimen, whether specially named or not, that has the character you're looking for.


Last edited by Steve in Brookings on Wed Dec 09, 2009 11:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.



Wed Dec 09, 2009 11:30 pm
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A bit of Googling shows a slim leaflet form of M. eurybracteata is being offered in the USA with the (God awful) name 'Soft Caress'.

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Thu Dec 10, 2009 5:27 pm
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Thats the one Steve!! I think your right though, i will just have to be a little patient.

I remember Wisley that had something similar to this, so i will hunt it out next time i'm there.

Thanks for the info :)


Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:09 pm
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That form does look nice, and quite distinct, Vic.
I remember seeing a TV programme about Roy Lancaster's garden in Hampshire - which looks stunning. There were many choice plants, including a superb Cordyline indivisa - but I remember being particularly taken by an uncommon shrub growing against a wall Mahonia russellii - I'd rather like one of those...
Pete


Thu Dec 10, 2009 10:38 pm
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What's fascinating about Mahonia russellii is its hardiness. I've been to the area this was discovered in Mexico (couldn't find it) and it is distinctly tropical, even at altitude; drop a few hundred metres and you are in coffee plantations. Saying that, it grows perfectly in my garden and was unaffected by last January's cold.

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Thu Dec 10, 2009 11:14 pm
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Nick, do you sell Mahonia russellii? A quick Google reveals it purports to flower twice (sometimes three times) a year, which is quite a selling point. Would you happen to know if the flowers are also scented?


Fri Dec 11, 2009 7:04 am
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Not something I really sell yet Peter. There is always so little material to propagate from, but in coming years it should be bulked up enough. Seed is produced en masse, though none of it is viable! It certainly likes to flower its head off, in fact it was doing so before the frost (might still be, I'll have to look), though from memory flowers have no scent. Lovely colour though - cream with pink sepals.

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Fri Dec 11, 2009 12:06 pm
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Thanks, Nick. I'll have to put russellii on my long term wish list.


Fri Dec 11, 2009 12:49 pm
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Peter Reid wrote:
Thanks, Nick. I'll have to put russellii on my long term wish list.

It's been on mine for a while, Peter
I'd happily turf something out to make space for it


Fri Dec 11, 2009 4:23 pm
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PeteFree wrote:
That form does look nice, and quite distinct, Vic.
I remember seeing a TV programme about Roy Lancaster's garden in Hampshire - which looks stunning. There were many choice plants, including a superb Cordyline indivisa - but I remember being particularly taken by an uncommon shrub growing against a wall Mahonia russellii - I'd rather like one of those...
Pete


Pete, m.russellii was exactly the reason i started looking up different sp of mahonia after reading a peice by Roy Lancaster in the RHS Garden mag. I just could not find a decent picture of it anywhere or much info on it, only a pencil drawing.


Fri Dec 11, 2009 8:38 pm
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